Idea Lab

Lifelong Learning = The Key to Success

This article was penned by Chelsey Tupper, director of operations and client development. 

Learning has always been an integral part of who I am. That’s probably because I was raised by two parents who realized the value of a solid education and both loved uncovering new knowledge. My mom and dad worked fervently to provide my sister and me with educational travel opportunities and even afforded me the ability to go to the college of my choosing. My parents gained their love for learning from their parents, and at the age of 33, I’m beyond blessed to still have the mentorship of all six of these individuals. I’ve witnessed firsthand from my family the importance of lifelong learning, from reading countless books (for pleasure and work) to learning history and trivia to staying abreast of changing trends in your profession and developing new hobbies. Further, I’ve learned that lifelong learning doesn’t just help you excel professionally but also keeps life fun, fresh and fascinating.

Aside from my parents and grandparents, I’ve been fortunate enough to have several mentors throughout my life, and the list only continues to grow. I love listening to others and learning all that I can from the people I meet because each of us has our own, unique experiences to share; it’s incredible what you can soak up from others if you just pay attention and listen. Two individuals whom I’ve been lucky enough to have as mentors over the past three years are my bosses Peter Steve and Donna Hansbury. Peter’s outlook on learning and bettering yourself is very similar to that of my parents and grandparents. He is always reading and researching, and he impresses the importance of this practice upon the Ideaworks team. Peter continuously says that reading all we can about our industry and those industries of our clients is what makes us an invaluable partner. And he’s right. Developing fresh solutions to our clients’ challenges and guiding them in the right direction are what make our clients come back to us, project after project, trusting in our ability to help them succeed. Donna has taught me to become a more strategic thinker and problem solver. For example, she has shown me the importance of taking the time to figure out a new program or concept, and not being too quick to ask others for assistance before delving into  it myself. It’s difficult to find solutions to such things if reading and researching aren’t part of your core, everyday tasks – yet another reason to embrace lifelong learning.

Back in April, I spoke at a local university as part of its annual communication conference for high school juniors and seniors. The conference helps students discern career paths within the communication industry. I love speaking to high school and college students because I remember when I was in their shoes, and listening to young professionals share their career stories and advice was always helpful and inspiring. For this particular engagement, I chose to speak about the value of lifelong learning and how vital it is for success in college and beyond. Throughout the presentation, I shared the advice I’ve gained from Peter and Donna, along with what I’ve learned from my own life experiences. Several students asked questions following the presentation, wanting me to share additional insight into how they, too, can adopt the “always be learning” mindset.

While I may never know which tips, tricks or stories from my presentation my audience found most inspiring, I’m confident that they, too, walked away with something valuable. And as I reflect on that experience and the many I’ve had to shape me into the professional I am today, I realize that there’s nothing more gratifying than helping one of those students reach an important realization: Lifelong learning really is the key to success, and you never know where its influence stops. I am certain that my parents, grandparents, Peter, Donna and the many other mentors I’ve been blessed to have would be proud that I am committed to paying forward what each of these individuals have impressed upon me.

Welcome to the Ideaworks team, Carla and Jorge!

 

This fall, we excitedly welcomed two graphic designers, Carla Henry and Jorge Ariza. Carla and Jorge join Patty Pugh on our creative team, responsible for employing their design prowess and artistic aptitude to bring our clients’ visions to life.

Ever since she was a little girl, Carla always had a creative eye, which is why she chose to major in graphic design. Earlier this year, she graduated from South Hills School of Business & Technology with her associate’s degree. Carla joins us from Posture Interactive, a Scranton-based digital marketing agency, where she served as an intern. In her free time, she enjoys playing Nintendo® games, binge-watching TV shows and drawing silly cartoons in various mediums.

 

Like Carla, Jorge has also had a passion for art and design from a young age, starting with drawing in elementary school. He graduated in 2015 from Keystone College with a bachelor’s in visual arts and is currently working on his master’s in graphic design at Marywood University. Outside of Ideaworks, Jorge always strives to develop his skills and works on a variety of different projects. For instance, he is in the process of starting his own clothing line, along with working on a children’s book series for his thesis.

 

We are delighted to have Carla and Jorge on board and look forward to each of them using their unique design talents to exceed client expectations. Please take a minute to welcome them to our team!

Mixing it up, marketing style

Search engine optimization (SEO), pay-per-click (PPC) ads, newspapers, radio, social media, television, billboards, e-newsletters, direct mail…

So many channels, so little time! And you can only stretch your budget so far. Here are four steps you can take to create a stellar recipe for marketing success.

  1. Establish a budget: Incorporating a budget doesn’t mean stressing about limitations; rather, it’s about exploring possibilities. Working within financial boundaries challenges you to be more thoughtful about how you’re spending your marketing dollars. By employing a more streamlined, targeted approach, you can reach prospects who are already considering the service or product you provide but haven’t decided just where to get it from yet. This is where search engine marketing (SEM) could come into play. Searching on websites like Google and Bing is the most popular medium for locating information. In fact, 74 percent of internet users perform local searches, and of this percentage, 82 percent of local searchers follow-up offline via an in-store visit, phone call or purchase. SEM is also very cost-effective compared to other marketing mediums, so it’s worth considering on a smaller budget.
  2. Know your target: It all boils down to understanding your customer. Warm-up to your target market’s demographics, psychographics and lifestyle. Geography, income, ethnicity, gender and age are key factors that impact buying decisions and habits. Knowing your target is especially helpful with digital marketing, where being in the right place at the right time has become less about serendipity and more about strategy. Take Facebook, for example, where 29.7 percent of users are between the ages 25 and 34. This is the prime target demographic for many businesses, so if it’s yours, investing in Facebook advertising will more than likely be beneficial.
  3. Be consistent: They key ingredient in your marketing mix is to create brand recognition, and that involves creating compelling content. While it’s nice to add some spice to your messaging, you want to make sure that everything blends together well and that one piece doesn’t overpower another. That means using consistent themes and messaging across all platforms you utilize. Prospects viewing an ad, web page, direct mail piece or even a video from a well-integrated campaign should receive a consistent flavor from your messaging, with each element of the mix complementing and reinforcing the others.
  4. Measure your success: What does the data show about what you are trying to accomplish? Be sure to measure your marketing efforts against your business goal(s). If one of your overarching goals is brand awareness, track your social media posts. If it’s attracting more visitors to your website, try using Google Analytics. If it’s sales, take a look at how many leads your direct mail or email campaign generated. Useful tools like Constant Contact, Hubspot and Marketo make it easy to follow each customer’s journey, starting with the first visit to your website. Take the time to monitor your progress so you’ll be able to amplify what’s working and adjust what’s not.

Still not sure how to mix it up? We can add the secret sauce your marketing plan has been craving. Contact Chelsey Tupper, director of operations & client development, to learn more about how we can help. She can be reached at 570-609-5650, ext. 310 or chelseyt@ideaworks.marketing.

 

 

From the Desk of Devanie Heller: 6 Things I Learned From My MarCom Internship

In January, I was determined to solidify my summer internship before going back to school for the spring semester. I wanted to be sure that I gave myself ample opportunity to find the perfect fit so that my first marketing internship would be worthwhile. Therefore, I Googled “marketing agencies in the Wilkes-Barre/Scranton area,” and began calling each agency to get an idea of who was looking for an intern.

After following up with Ideaworks, I was asked to come in for a face-to-face interview with the agency’s director of marketing communication, Pete, and senior manager of marketing communication, Alyssa. The interview went wonderfully, and the next thing I knew, I received a call with an offer! Little did I know that once I met the rest of the team and began diving into my work, it would feel like home. The culture was so open and friendly that I truly couldn’t have been happier to be part of the team. I absolutely loved coming into work every morning – always wearing a smile, ready to tackle the day’s responsibilities.

During my three months as a member of the Ideaworks team, I learned so much that it’s nearly impossible to whittle down an all-encompassing list of the knowledge and insight I gained, but these six items are surely significant.

  1. Don’t be afraid to ask questions

Since this was my first internship, I was eager to absorb everything I could, which often meant asking many questions. Though I was undoubtedly anxious to jump into a new adventure, everyone was more than welcoming. It did not take long for me to warm up to my co-workers and ask for help or clarification, because I always wanted to do my best and impress the rest of the team.

  1. Every day is different when you intern at an agency

Each day at Ideaworks was unlike the one prior. Some projects were large, others were small, but each had its own originality and importance for our valued clients. I sat in on various conference calls, discussing anything from the types of graphics that would work best on a concert venue’s promotional collateral to the kinds of prizes and incentives that would most appeal to a client’s target audience. From each client call I participated in, I learned several tips and tricks about how to talk with clients and the best ways to work with them to meet their respective needs and wants. Above all, one of the most important things I learned is that it’s always top priority to deliver exceptional work for clients.

  1. The real world is different from the classroom

While I did not receive a letter grade for my work here, I still needed to put forth my best effort when working on any task to which I was assigned. Nonetheless, that is about the only similarity between school and my internship. At Ideaworks, I was able to learn first-hand how to organize and structure projects, follow new client developments, create social media schedules and more – not just read about them from a textbook or simply learn definitions. I’ve always enjoyed school; however, after my time with Ideaworks, I’m even more eager to dive into my marketing career.

  1. Independence is everything

The classic intern stereotype is that he or she runs for coffee and scans papers all day without truly contributing to the team. My experience at Ideaworks was the exact opposite, for which I am tremendously thankful. My first week on the job, I was given a list of projects to start developing in collaboration with our content team, and it made me incredibly happy to know I was entrusted with these tasks. Giving an intern, like me, the independence and trust to take on client projects meant so much, and I was grateful for the opportunity to make each project my own, which also helped increase my confidence. It was such a great feeling to work with a team that believed in my abilities and wanted to see me succeed, especially as a young woman new to this industry.

  1. Social media is more complex than you might think

Before my internship, I never had the opportunity to manage a business’ social media, but I was always eager to do so. Now, thanks to Ideaworks, I can proudly say that I have professional experience handling all things social, such as brainstorming, writing, editing and proofreading post content; posting and scheduling; and managing accounts on the various platforms. I learned that a substantial amount of research and time go into crafting a post for just one platform, let alone creating a weekly content schedule. I’ve also come to better understand which types of content keep followers engaged. Gaining more experience with social media management was a valuable experience that I know will suit me well when I begin my career in marketing, since the use of social media isn’t slowing down anytime soon.

  1. Change is good, and experience is invaluable

A summer internship in my field of study was such a great opportunity because I had the chance to learn many new things and gain invaluable hands-on experience. I firmly believe that my internship with Ideaworks helped sharpen my skillset in a way that will prove invaluable when it comes to interviewing for marketing jobs after graduation. I am a firm believer that change is positive, and this summer, I realized that the dynamic atmosphere of a marketing agency is a great fit for me and one in which I can see myself excelling.

 

Each day that I came to work this summer, I was given opportunities to step out of my comfort zone, and as a result, I learned more about myself and my abilities. Because I made it a point to be proactive and find my summer internship early – and then absorb as much knowledge as I could during it – my time with Ideaworks was extremely beneficial and rewarding. I cannot stress enough how happy and thankful I am to have been part of the Ideaworks Marketing team this summer; it was truly the perfect fit for me!

-Devanie Heller, Ideaworks Marketing intern, summer 2019 

Are You In, Out or Somewhere in Between?

The trade show: It’s a classic meet and greet, “get-your-business-out-there” event that traditional marketers and those who’ve been around the business block a time or two know quite well. Cue the bold pop-up banners and steam-pressed table linens, enticing giveaways and booth activities.

Years ago, trade shows were one of the best ways to network with prospective customers and see what your industry rivals were doing, even if that meant channeling your inner sleuth to capture some collateral from the competing booths around the ballroom. Trade shows were (and still are) about getting in front of a broad audience to tell your story, qualify your prospects and grow your business – whether the prospect was “all in” for your elevator pitch or looking for the nearest exit.

Think of such shows as traditional marketing efforts, or what is now referred to as outbound marketing. This type of marketing involves raising brand awareness and marketing a particular product or service through general media advertising – much like what a business would do at an industry trade show or tabling event in the 1990s. Other examples of outbound include print advertisements, television and radio ads, billboards, cold calling and the like.

In addition to outbound marketing, there is inbound marketing (also known as content marketing), which was coined by HubSpot in 2005. This style of marketing was born out of the growth of the internet and search engine optimization (SEO), emergence of Google Analytics, and consumers’ increasing use of smartphones, tablets and other devices. To better understand inbound marketing, consider the following: You’re perusing a drugstore or specialty shop to purchase a greeting card for someone. Each holiday, celebration or situation has specific cards with messages tailored to that observance. Then, the messages are further personalized for everyone from your mother to your pastor. Similarly, inbound marketing involves drawing prospective customers in with targeted messaging and timely, relevant and seemingly personalized content, much like the greeting card, which is only meaningful and relevant to the recipient.

In all, inbound marketing stems from understanding the buyer journey – or the steps involved in making a purchase. These include awareness, consideration, decision and loyalty. Content is then crafted around that buyer’s journey and can include blogs, whitepapers, podcasts and targeted social media.

As you adjust and refine your marketing mix this year, you’ll want to consider which efforts you currently use and reflect on their successes and shortcomings. Outbound marketing has undoubtedly received its fair share of criticism as of late, being called a “blanketed” approach with generalized messaging. On the other hand, inbound marketing has grown in popularity amongst more and more content creators due to its highly personalized approach. But does that make one or the other the “right one” for your business? Not necessarily.

Ultimately, deciding which marketing strategy to use comes down to understanding your buyer, business offer and big goals. Why? Because there’s a difference between how you go about marketing certain products compared to others. Doing a little research on who your buyers are and what their purchasing decisions look like will help shape your marketing efforts. For example, consider classic billboards along the highway that tell drivers how far a fast food franchise is from that particular location. This content isn’t very tailored, but the outbound marketing effort works well because the busy traveler likely isn’t embarking on a full-fledged buyer journey before pulling off the nearest exit. Put simply, this individual is hungry, and he or she isn’t going to be as selective when determining what to eat.

Conversely, if your target audience needs to do thorough research before making a purchasing decision, e.g. new brick ovens for a pizza shop franchise, he or she might benefit from inbound efforts in which you educate and engage him or her subtly in every stage of the buyer journey, eventually turning to your business to make a purchase and form a loyalty to your brand.

While there is no clear-cut answer as to which marketing strategy to use since every business is different, you might consider adopting a healthy mix of the two to add vigor to your marketing efforts. For example, if you’re used to developing outbound pieces, start thinking about inbound. First, you’ll want to clearly define your buyer and plot their journey from awareness to loyalty. Ask yourself: Who is this person? What are his or her pain points? What are his or her purchasing habits like? Who is this individual as a person – not just a buyer? Consider the individual’s demographics and any other pertinent information based on what you know.

Next, choose a topic that your buyer would likely be researching and need to think deeply about before purchasing, keeping in mind that awareness is also key and can begin with those generalized outbound efforts. Begin developing content for each stage in that buyer’s journey, aiming toward eventual purchase of the product. Echoing the brick oven example, a business such as this might start curating a series of blogs or develop an e-book that exposes the benefits of specific brick oven cooking methods. Getting prospective buyers to download the e-book or return to the blog will help that business move the prospect down the sales funnel, hopefully converting that individual into a loyal customer and promoter.

If you’re all-in for inbound but one of your goals is general brand awareness or quick lead generation, it might be time to experiment with some outbound efforts. While not as targeted, billboards, print ads and the like could establish better brand recognition and meet your objectives in a way you didn’t consider, especially if it is a new product or service offering that people aren’t necessarily hard-pressed to make an informed decision about before purchasing, e.g. fast food off the nearest highway exit.

Think about your company’s brand story and the ways in which you plan to use it to engage your target audience. Don’t feel you need to, figuratively speaking, pack up your trade show materials just yet or forego all traditional advertising methods for the latest and greatest content creation strategies. Know that it’s okay – and often a smart marketing move – to be “in[bound]”, “out[bound]” and somewhere in between. The most important point to keep in mind isn’t really so complicated at all: Go back to the basics and understand what you are marketing, to whom and your end goal. The rest will fall into place and help your marketing efforts not only generate success in 2019 but in the years ahead as well.

Announcing our Partnership with Luzerne County Historical Society

Ideaworks Marketing is excited to announce our agency’s new partnership with the Luzerne County Historical Society (LCHS), which we officially elected as our “charity of choice” this spring! As our charity of choice, LCHS will receive complimentary marketing support from our team, ranging from conducting focus groups to creating a comprehensive marketing plan, including goals, objectives, strategies and tactics to generate awareness and interest in the Society. Community support is crucial at Ideaworks, as we have supported various non-profit organizations on both national and local scales over the past 21 years in business.

When asked about our new partnership, Alyssa Ellsworth, senior manager of marketing communications, had this to say: “Supporting our local community is incredibly important to our agency. Moreover, Luzerne County is rich in history. Being given the privilege to help LCHS further allows our team to work with one of the oldest non-profits in the county – one that is committed to preserving and protecting the history and events that have shaped this area.”

Peter and Alyssa getting ready to conduct the focus groups

To kick off our support for LCHS, our owner and CCO, Peter Steve, recently conducted three focus groups for the Society – free of charge – with Alyssa as his research associate. The duo uncovered valuable insights regarding the Historical Society’s perception in our area and is using them to finalize a follow-up report as well as guide the Society’s marketing plan, which is currently underway.

Aimee Newell, Ph.D., executive director for LCHS, will work closely with our agency as we spearhead marketing efforts for the Society. “We are thrilled to work with Peter, Alyssa and the team at Ideaworks. We appreciate having their expert advice and guidance and look forward to putting their insight to use by increasing community engagement with our local history,” said Dr. Newell.

From the President’s Desk: My National Small Business Week “Mighty Moment”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Each year, the hard work and dedication of small businesses and their teams are recognized throughout the first full week of May during National Small Business Week. As a women-owned small business, I’m sure you can imagine the significance of this celebration for all of us at Ideaworks. Playing along with this year’s theme, Small is Mighty, the team asked me to share my own “Mighty Moment” from my career – any event or occurrence that has made me feel mighty being a part of a small business. Put frankly, there is no way I could come up with a single moment that stands out from my 36-year career, but our team’s ask got me thinking about the fact that I have spent my entire career working in a small business.

Of course, there have been times in which I wondered what might have been different had I decided to work for a larger organization, but I can honestly say that I have never regretted my choice. The truth is, when you work for a small business (particularly in the roles I have), you get to learn — and learn fast — how everything works from the ground up. You have a hand in everything, from deciding who will clean the building and how often, to making major decisions about capital purchases, financing, payroll, healthcare packages and so on.

This knowledge has always been invaluable to me.

In marketing, we succeed by immersing ourselves in a client’s business, understanding their customers and their needs, along with the goods and services the client offers to meet those needs. Running a small business has only deepened such immersion, helping me realize the pressures our clients face on every level. That makes me even more appreciative whenever they entrust our team with one of their initiatives. After all, we wouldn’t be a “mighty” small business without them!

GOAL! THE NEXT ISSUE OF DAZZLE IS A SCORE!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We are thrilled to bring you the latest issue of our award-winning agency magazine, DAZZLE! This issue is especially exciting, as it features a must-read article from guest author Peter Loge.

The issue highlights Loge’s recent book, titled “Soccer Thinking for Management Success: Lessons for Organizations from the World’s Game,” which is a favorite of Ideaworks owner Peter Steve. In addition to being an author, Loge is an assistant professor at The George Washington University in Washington D.C.

Along with Loge’s feature article, a few additional highlights of this issue include:

  • A Special Thank You to Some Very Strong Women,” in which Peter Steve pays homage to the many inspiring females who have helped him succeed professionally while reflecting on his receipt of the Northeast Pennsylvania Chapter of the American Advertising Federation’s prestigious Silver Medal Award (p. 22)
  • Our Award-Winning Calendar, delving into the creative inspiration behind Ideaworks’ annual calendar, which received three American Advertising Awards (ADDYs) this year (p. 5)
  • “Are You In, Out or Somewhere in Between?,” examining the difference between inbound and outbound marketing and which might be right for your business (p. 14)

Click here to read the issue. We hope you enjoy it, and please don’t hesitate to provide us with your feedback by emailing Chelsey Tupper at chelseyt@ideaworks.marketing. We’d love to know what you think of the publication. And remember, we’re always here if you’d like to chat about any marketing challenges you’re facing and how Ideaworks can help you solve them.

What We’re Reading: 5 Pieces of Marketing Content Our Team Members Love

Every day, media outlets both large and small fill their feeds with articles that offer insightful tips and tricks to help modern marketers stay abreast of the latest trends and best practices. In today’s digital world, this advice is seemingly endless, opening the door to new growth opportunities for small agencies and their teams.

At Ideaworks, staying up-to-date on reading and research is a task that our team members incorporate into their daily to-do lists. Throughout his career, our owner and CCO Peter Steve has seen first-hand how critical reading and research are to success. As such, this is a quality Peter has come to instill into each member of our team. Therefore, we found it fitting to pose the following question to five of our team members: “What is the most influential article you have read in the last few months?”

Peter Steve could not choose an article in particular but instead selected a motivating book: Soccer Thinking for Management Success: Lessons for Organizations from the World’s Game by Peter Loge, which suggests that management is even more relatable to routine activities than we might have once thought. When asked why this has been his favorite read over the past few months, Peter remarked, “I loved it because it provided great insight into how the game of soccer (a sport near and dear to me) directly relates to how organizations are structured and managed.”

Donna Hansbury, president and CEO, chose “The Evolution of Marketing to Women” as her pick for the best industry read she’s delved into over the past few months. Donna explains, “I never hesitate to find insightful articles from Mintel, but I found this one particularly refreshing because it provides an excellent look at authenticity in marketing and where our industry is headed. The celebration of females’ unique strengths, beauty and empowerment is inspiring more marketing campaigns, and it is something I hope to see even more frequently in the future.”

Chelsey Tupper, director of operations and client development, shared, “Southwest Airlines’ Awful Week Shows the Difference Between Customer Service and Customer Centricity.” Published on medium.com, this blog post delves into the criticality of ensuring that the entire customer experience journey is top-notch. Chelsey explains why she chose this article: “It illustrates that customers have to be at the center of ALL business decisions within a company, which also highlights the evolution of marketing over the past 10 years. It’s no longer about the brand – it HAS to be about the customer.”

Peter Froehlich, director of marketing communications, recently transitioned from the world of academia to agency life at Ideaworks. Peter understands the unique professional situation the Harvard Business Review outlines in “Facing your Mid-Career Crisis.” He explains, “I chose this article because it speaks to my situation pretty eloquently. I identified with feeling stale in a workplace routine. It was painful to leave a familiar career behind, but I’m finding a lot more excitement and satisfaction in marcom than I had felt in teaching and research in ages!”

Good Copywriting Starts with a Graphic Designer” was senior manager of marketing communication Alyssa Ellsworth’s pick for the most inspirational and influential article she’s read over the past few months. “I love this article because it showcases how important it is for copywriters and graphic designers to engage in true collaboration on client projects – something that we do every day at Ideaworks.”

These are only a few of the latest industry  articles that stood out to our team. You can bet that we will most certainly continue reading and growing as an agency to better understand the many different perspectives that impact our business and industry. We invite you to share your favorite marketing read with us in the comments below!

 

FROM MY PERSPECTIVE: WOMEN’S HISTORY MONTH

By now, I hope you have seen a number of posts on our agency’s social media platforms in honor of Women’s History Month. Each one delightfully different from the last, the posts bring to light what Women’s History Month means to the talented ladies who comprise our team.

When I consider what this month means to me, I reflect on the many influential women in my life – from loving family members to dear friends and the many dedicated, career-minded women whom I have had the pleasure of working with for many years.

I’m proud to be part of a network of courageous women who never settle for “good enough” – ladies who have offered unwavering encouragement since Ideaworks’ inception and, of course, the many women, past and present, with whom I have collaborated on some of our agency’s most successful projects and initiatives.

As a women-owned business, this month is especially important for us. It is about celebrating women’s achievements. It’s about coming together to consider how far we’ve come as a group. It’s about creating a gender-balanced world in which bias has no place.

Ideaworks has been proud to employ many creative, career-driven women over the years, always respecting each one’s unique talents and ability to deliver impeccable creative work for our valued clients. Moreover, I’m proud that we’ve cultivated an environment in which every individual – regardless of gender, age or the like – is motivated to achieve his or her very best, rising to new challenges to grow into a more seasoned professional. I believe it is this type of environment in which leaders of all kinds emerge and thrive, and it is my hope that our agency continues to perpetuate these ideals for many years to come.

So as this month comes to a close, I encourage all of you to champion women’s many achievements all year long. Continue fighting for women’s advancement. Make a positive difference for the females in your life. Empower your daughters, friends, sisters and co-workers to achieve their personal and professional goals, whatever they may be.


– Judy Steve, owner